Champagne Glasses

champagne-glasses

Few things can symbolize a very special occasion better than a chilled bottle of champagne. From  intimate dinner parties to wedding dinners, it is the wine of choice when only the best will do. And for true wine lovers the style of glass can enhance or detract from your experience. What kind of glass will work best for you?

The Coupe

This classic shape, a wide rim and short stem, is best associated with the 1920’s flappers or the 1960’s. The glass was designed in 17th century England specifically for drinking champagne. However, the glasses were designed for what were really dessert wines, not the fine wines of the current day.

Critics of the coupe shape, or saucers as they are often called, suggest that the wide bowl is so broad that the carbonation falls flat too quickly. And, with the bubbles falling flat, the aroma is also lost.

For wine connoisseurs and those who love the bubbles, this glass style is not your best choice. If you love the history associated with the glass, then sip quickly and enjoy.

The Tulip

This style of glass is similar in design to he flute, but it has a wider base and he rim is curved inward. Unlike the coupe, wine connoisseurs highly recommend this glass because of its ability to retain your wine’s exquisite flavor.

The round bowl at the bottom of the glass keeps  helps to keep the flavor preserved as you sip your wine. The medium- to long-stemmed glass also keeps your fingers from touching the bowl where the champagne is preventing your fingerprints from warming the wine.

The Flute

The flute overtook the coupe shape because of how well it captures the flavor of the champagne. With a medium or long stem, you can hold the glass without altering the wine’s temperature, and  the glass is the perfect shape for the perfect sip.

The shape of the flute gives the right serving amount to keep it cold, aromatic, and bubbly. The flute glass maintains the effervescence after pouring so the bubbles and aroma stay in the glass. And when the bubbles stay in the glass, you can enjoy the bubbly taste and your glass will be more pleasing to look at.

The Stemless

The latest trends in new glass design include a stemless glass. This bowl-shaped glass enhances the taste and the aroma. Since your fingers are on the bowl warming the champagne, critics still prefer the flute.

The critics agree that the flute is your best choice. But take your time to sample them all to find a style that you love as much as your champagne.

How to Buy Budget Friendly Champagne

how-to-buy-budget-friendly-champagne

Your son’s or daughter’s graduation or an expected promotion: both reasons to crack out the the Dom Perignon and celebrate in style.

Sometimes, though, you need a budget-friendly bottle of bubbly or quality sparkling wine to keep the fridge well-stocked on New Year’s Day. With that in mind, here are some tips and great affordable champagnes to check out.

Finding Budget-Conscious Champagnes 

There are definitely some delicious brut champagnes out there that blend affordability, crisp taste and quality.

Roederer Estate Brut, for instance, comes in at around $20 and features a robust, oak-aged fruity essence. It’s bright and citrusy without being overbearing.

http://www.totalwine.com/eng/product/roederer-estate-brut/454750

Another standout brut champagne from California is Gloria Ferrer Sonoma. Like Roaderer Estate, Gloria Ferrer Sonoma blends a fruity essence with smoother notes. In this case, you’re getting a mixture of pear and an almond aftertaste.

http://www.gloriaferrer.com

The secret to these two budget champagne’s is their appellation in California’s vineyards and dedication to quality ingredients. Gloria Ferrer Sonoma starts with nearly two dozen base wines to ultimately give a rich, bubbly and extremely budget-friendly final product.

Wine Spectator magazine even conceded that Gloria Ferrer Sonoma deserved a score in the 90s due to its complex taste that blended pear, cinnamon and raspberry without being overbearing.

Since Gloria Ferrer Sonoma sells for between $15 and $25, you won’t have to break the bank to find out what all the praise is about.

Overall, though, you should keep your eyes peeled for low-cost bruts that bring together an eclectic range of base wines with California appellations.

Nitty-Gritty Specifics to Look For 

Price is obviously a primary consideration when you need a few affordable stand-by (or stand-in) bottles of champagne or you know that quantity is going to trump discernment on, say, a riotous New Year’s celebration.

You should be keeping your eyes peeled for an affordable champagne – under $50 – that draws from a host of quality base wines to form the champagne’s cuvee.

An eclectic range of base wines that undergo two fermentations should also provide more bubbles and ultimately a richer taste. Also be aware that base wines that are tank fermented tend to provide a more airy, fruity taste.

Another thing to keep in mind is that although many brut champagnes tend to have moderate sweetness, there are extra dry champagnes out there that give you more idiosyncratic and interesting honeydew and brioche flavors.

Remember that the majority of budget champagnes tend to be bruts, and make sure you find an affordable champagne that draws from many base wines to bring out a delicious, fruity aftertaste.