The Downside to Refrigerating Champagne for Long Periods

the-downside-to-refrigerating-champagne-for-long-periods

Champagne is the universal celebratory drink for all of life’s most memorable occasions. Whether it’s the birth of a baby, graduation, or a wedding, you will most likely find bubbling Moet or some other variety of Champagne.¬†However, sometimes you may purchase one or two bottles too many.

In this instance, it’s best to know how to store Champagne. Continue reading to learn more about storing Champagne and the downsides of keeping it refrigerated for long periods of time.

How to Store Champagne?

Essentially, Champagne should be stored like any other alcohol. As long as the bottle isn’t opened, it should be stored in a dry, cool, and dark place. Most people store Champagne in cellars and in pantries, which are both excellent places. It’s best to avoid storing Champagne in places where the temperatures fluctuate often.

How Long Can Champagne Last?

Similar to other wines, Champagne has an extremely long shelf life when it is stored properly. However, this doesn’t mean all bottles of Champagne are designed to be stored for years. In general, there are two different types of Champagnes: vintage and regular.

Storing Vintage Champagne

Vintage Champagne is designed to be stored for long periods of time as it continues to age in the bottle. Overtime, the taste of these Champagnes changes and becomes richer and more robust. The majority of wine connoisseurs will agree these aged Champagnes are better.

Storing Regular Champagne

In contrast, these regular bottles of Champagne do not get better with time. They are designed to be stored for a few years at the very most.

Champagne and Refrigeration

Once you open a bottle of Champagne, it’s best to finish it in the same day. If you don’t, you may be able to store it in the fridge for a few days, but the bottle will become flat and lose it taste after a couple of days.

However, refrigerator isn’t the ideal solution for long-term storage. Refrigerators are much colder than the majority of wine storage facilities. When storing Champagne, 50 degree is the sweet spot. Refrigerators are much colder than this and have humidity levels that is bad for the Champagne.

While it may be cool to keep the bottle in the fridge for a few weeks, it’s best to avoid storing Champagne in the refrigerator for long periods of time. Another downside of storing Champagne in the refrigerator is the light may damage the bottle.

When Champagne is released from the producer’s cellar, it’s at the optimum drinking age. However, many bottles are able to be exquisitely aged. To achieve this expert aging, it requires that the bottle to be kept cool, but not freezing in an average level of humidity. Even though it may be possible to regulate humidity in a fridge, it’s much easier to simply keep the bottle cool.

If you are planning on taking a bottle to someone’s house to drink for the night, fill a bucket half way with ice and then top it off with water. Leave the bottle in there for approximately 20 minutes and you should be fine.