Grape Vine Maturity

grape-vine-maturity

Grapevine cuttings or shoots are usually planted in the spring and take three years to produce grapes that can be used for wine. Climate and soil conditions play an important role in vine growth and grape production.

Nurturing

The young vines must be pampered to grow into mature producers of quality grapes. They need sunlight, irrigated but well drained soil and pruning. The small shoot planted in the spring will grow into a vine with stalks and delicate side canes that should be trained along a trellis.

Wine producing vines are nurtured with smaller trellises and fences that give them room to spread during their second season. The trellis or fence can be metal, wood, rope or any type of line. The vines will wrap themselves around the thin links or slats of the trellis. You can train table grape vines to cover a decorative gazebo or arched structure over three years.

The vine has to be pruned to permit new growth. The stem or trunk grows the first year while new growth appears in the second year. Only four canes or stalks should be allowed to grow from each cutting the first year. Their vines should be trained along the trellis the second year. If you are growing grape vines, you will have to prune about 70% of the vine the first two years.

The vines should begin to sprout leaves and buds that grow into grapes by the third year. Any grapes that appear during the second season are not considered wine quality.

Climate and soil

Different varieties of grapes grow in different climates and soil conditions. All grapes require sunlight during the growing season and soil that is well drained. Rain helps to irrigate the plants but there must be sufficient runoff.

Weather is important in growing vines and determining the quality of wine grapes. Most grapes need cool, moist temperatures. Some grape varieties such as the Pinot Meunier used in champagne like colder weather and bud a little later in the spring. The Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes traditionally used in champagne blends or cuvees need a slightly warmer environment and chalky limestone soil.

Most grapes are harvested in the fall from late August to early October in the Northern Hemisphere. The sugar level is tested and the grapes picked and processed when they are in their prime, before the first frost.  Some species of grapes in Canada are harvested after the first frost to produce the famous Ice Wine.

Grapes in the Southern Hemisphere are harvested during March. Grapes are grown as far south as Chile and Argentina in the Western Hemisphere. South Africa and Australia are also know for outstanding wine production.

Vines that are well tended and pampered can last for 40 years as long as they are not infested with diseases and rot. Healthy mature vines can produce cuttings and shoots for new planting. Grapes were probably the first fruit cultivated by ancient people and wine is one of the world’s oldest beverages.

The Downside to Refrigerating Champagne for Long Periods

the-downside-to-refrigerating-champagne-for-long-periods

Champagne is the universal celebratory drink for all of life’s most memorable occasions. Whether it’s the birth of a baby, graduation, or a wedding, you will most likely find bubbling Moet or some other variety of Champagne. However, sometimes you may purchase one or two bottles too many.

In this instance, it’s best to know how to store Champagne. Continue reading to learn more about storing Champagne and the downsides of keeping it refrigerated for long periods of time.

How to Store Champagne?

Essentially, Champagne should be stored like any other alcohol. As long as the bottle isn’t opened, it should be stored in a dry, cool, and dark place. Most people store Champagne in cellars and in pantries, which are both excellent places. It’s best to avoid storing Champagne in places where the temperatures fluctuate often.

How Long Can Champagne Last?

Similar to other wines, Champagne has an extremely long shelf life when it is stored properly. However, this doesn’t mean all bottles of Champagne are designed to be stored for years. In general, there are two different types of Champagnes: vintage and regular.

Storing Vintage Champagne

Vintage Champagne is designed to be stored for long periods of time as it continues to age in the bottle. Overtime, the taste of these Champagnes changes and becomes richer and more robust. The majority of wine connoisseurs will agree these aged Champagnes are better.

Storing Regular Champagne

In contrast, these regular bottles of Champagne do not get better with time. They are designed to be stored for a few years at the very most.

Champagne and Refrigeration

Once you open a bottle of Champagne, it’s best to finish it in the same day. If you don’t, you may be able to store it in the fridge for a few days, but the bottle will become flat and lose it taste after a couple of days.

However, refrigerator isn’t the ideal solution for long-term storage. Refrigerators are much colder than the majority of wine storage facilities. When storing Champagne, 50 degree is the sweet spot. Refrigerators are much colder than this and have humidity levels that is bad for the Champagne.

While it may be cool to keep the bottle in the fridge for a few weeks, it’s best to avoid storing Champagne in the refrigerator for long periods of time. Another downside of storing Champagne in the refrigerator is the light may damage the bottle.

When Champagne is released from the producer’s cellar, it’s at the optimum drinking age. However, many bottles are able to be exquisitely aged. To achieve this expert aging, it requires that the bottle to be kept cool, but not freezing in an average level of humidity. Even though it may be possible to regulate humidity in a fridge, it’s much easier to simply keep the bottle cool.

If you are planning on taking a bottle to someone’s house to drink for the night, fill a bucket half way with ice and then top it off with water. Leave the bottle in there for approximately 20 minutes and you should be fine.

Unique Champagne and Food Pairings

unique-champagne and-food-pairings

Champagne is a great way to make your meals classier. Having a fine wine to sip while enjoying the ambiance of a place, listening to a soothing background music, and eating lavish dishes is one’s definition of a perfect date.

It goes without saying that there are certain types of food that goes best with fine wine. There is really no absolute way to determine the perfect champagne food pairings, but we can give you some ideas of what to serve, or eat, while enjoying a delicious bottle of your favorite fine wine. Today, we will cover these food pairings, and a little about champagne in general.

What’s Special About Champagne?

As we all know, champagne is a type of fine wine. However, when we talk about champagne, we are referring to a particular type of fine wine that is produced specifically using grapes that are grown in the Champagne wine region in France. This type of fine wine also follows certain rules on its production in order to be classified as a “champagne.” Another thing to note is that champagne can only be made by three grape types that are:

  • Chardonnay
  • Pinot Meunier
  • Pinot Noir

This may clear up the difference between wine and champagne. Now let’s get on to five unique champagne food pairings:

1. Roasted Goose

Roasted goose is a must-try when having a sip of your favorite champagne. The flavor of the chicken is just enough to stimulate your appetite, while not overpowering the sweetness of champagne at the same time. It is better to baste the goose with a mildly-acidic sauce like orange or plum for a better combination of flavors

2. Seafood Hors d’oeurve

Champagne does well with seafood hors d’oeurve because of their saltiness. The flavor’s presence in seafood appetizers combined with the flavor of the champagne is something to try out. If you want to be classier, try combining smoked salmon with Roquefort cheese. The richness of the flavor of the salmon and cheese combined with the sweetness of the champagne will make an elegant pairing.

3. Truffles

Truffles have their own unique flavor, and they are harvested in the autumn. When you get truffles in season, their flavors complement the flavors of champagne as there will be a symphony of flavors in your mouth.

4. Sushi

Champagne paired with sushi is a different way of enjoying the meal. Sushi comes in different forms, but offers the same delicious and mild taste that is good for an appetizer. Pairing it with champagne gives it more flavor and more reasons to enjoy this traditional Japanese recipe.

5. Cheese

Nothing goes wrong when you pair champagne with cheese. Almost all types of cheese are great to pair with champagne. Cheeses are good with champagne because its flavor is not overpowering, but is still enough to stimulate your taste. There are a lot of types of cheese to choose from, but the best combinations would be Gouda, brie, Colby, and mild cheddar.

You’ve seen a few unique food pairings for champagne, but in reality, champagne food pairings are endless. You just have to know how to balance the flavor of the food and the wine in order to create a pairing that will be worthy to a sommelier’s taste buds. Don’t be afraid to try different champagne and food combinations. There will surely be a pair or two that will stand out and will have your sense of taste fully stimulated.

Fruit and Champagne

 

fruit-and-champagne

The great thing about champagne is that it goes so well with a wide variety of foods.  When you think of champagne there are probably a slew of food pairings that will immediately come to mind.  The classic cheese and champagne pairing is and has always been there, but there are always fruit options as well.  When it comes to fruit, many champagne lovers want to know which fruits are going to go best with their glass of bubbly.

The fruit choices that you can go with when go are drinking champagne are going to fall into a few different categories.  It really depends on the taste that you are looking to get out of the combination.  No matter which way you cut it though, fruit and champagne are truly great together.  Their combination can make for some amazing tastes that are going to get your buds dancing and make the bubbly that much more enjoyable.

Berries Everywhere

The first type of fruit that is going to go absolutely perfectly with champagne is that of berries.  When you have a light champagne, berries are what you want to be reaching for.  The sweet taste of berries can really get the palette ready to enjoy champagne that much more.  This pairing is truly hard to top when you are talking about champagne and fruit.  The berries could be any of your favorite, classic berries.  This means strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, they are all going to make for great options to go with champagne.

Stone Fruits

The other option for you when it comes to pairing fruit with champagne is to go with stone fruits.  These include such fruits as peaches and plums.  These may seem like a strange combination at first glance, but give it a try.  The way that they come together with the light taste of champagne and sparkling wine is beyond delectable.

The fruit and champagne pairing is one that continues to really make waves.  There is nothing like having some berries or stone fruits with a nice, light glass of bubbly.  Pairing fruit with champagne can give you a sweet and smooth taste that will get your taste buds dancing and will have you never looking back.  If you have never paired fruit with champagne before, now is the time to give it a try.  When you grab that glass of champagne, pair it with fruit and let the tastes soar.

What is Champagne Disgorgement?

what-is-champagne-disgorgement

Disgorgement is the process of eliminating the sediment from Champagne and sparkling wine before it is corked and ready for sale. The disgorgement date has nothing to do with the age of the sparkling wine or when it was put on sale.

The French term is degorgementThis is an important step in producing sparkling wines that probably has its origins in the Champagne district in France. The wine is fermented a second time for at least 15 months to three years, depending on the winemakers. The dead yeast cells resulting from the fermentation are called lees in English. The process is called aging sur lies in French.

The neck of the wine bottle is racked at an angle so that the sediments, including the dead yeast cells, collect in that part of the bottle as the wine ages. The bottles are racked with a freezing brine around the neck that makes sediment removal very easy. The bubbles help push the lees out of the neck and the dosage is added before it is securely corked and ready for sale. The disgorgement is one of the final steps in the process of making Champagne and other sparkling wines.

Dosage

This refers to the amount of sugar added to the wine before it is sold. Yes, sugar is added to French Champagne and other sparkling wines to give them more flavor and balance the acidity. The Extra Brut or dry sparkling wine has less than 6 grams of sugar per liter (g/l). The Brut, that has 6 to 15 g/l of residual sugar, is still very dry.

Wines with Sec designations usually have 16 g/l or more of sugar. An Extra Sec has up to 20 g/l of sugar. This makes the wine tastier to people who want a sparkling wine with a degree of sweetness. Demi-sec can have up to 50 g/l and Doux is the sweetest wine with more than 51 g/l of sugar. These are usually considered sparkling wines served with dessert.

Cuvee

This is the finished batch of sparkling wine. Champagne and other bubbly wines will not always be disgorged at the same time. A batch or cuvee with one date may taste different from bottles disgorged and prepared for sale at a later date. This system is now used for sparkling wines made in the United States and other countries.

If you are a knowledgeable wine consumer, you will be aware of the differences in the dates. Many people are not aware that the disgorgement date only tells you when the Champagne is prepared for sale. This makes the system open to controversy in the U.S. The good news is that more people who enjoy sparkling wines are now learning about this process so the date is important.

Wine experts advise consumers to buy what they like but to be aware that not all sparkling wines from one vineyard or winemaker will taste the same. Read the labels and experiment to find the sparkling wines you like.

How to Buy Inexpensive Champagne

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The words “inexpensive champagne” may fill you with horror, but inexpensive doesn’t have to carry all the connotations of “cheap”. In fact, going off the beaten track and avoiding the big brand names can lead to some fabulous discoveries that will be perfect for anything from the holiday season to family celebrations.

Champagne or Cava?

The first thing you can do to slash costs without losing quality is to head for other sparkling bubbly that can’t use the name by virtue of where it is produced. Prosecco, cava, and other sparkling wines are  similar type substitutes that can taste like they are ten times the price you paid for them. As with any wine, it’s a matter of personal taste, so if you’re sampling with a particular occasion in mind, be careful to do your physical research (i.e. drinking!) as well as reading online and offline reviews.

Deals and Steals

Close to the holiday season, retailers are keen to attract customers with good deals on food and drink, so if you find a variety you like, look out for offers such as free bottles for multibuys, and discounts with other purchases. Again, be wary, as this can often be a way to get rid of bottles that haven’t been so well-received, or are otherwise not selling for a variety of reasons.

The Right Stuff

If it absolutely has to be the real deal, from the Champagne region of France, then there are some familiar names that provide value as well as a guarantee that you are getting quality. A smart move is look for growers in valleys close to the big names, and try their produce, which is often a third of the price of wines bottled further up or down the valley. Additionally, choose bottles which are non-vintage, and save the premier label varieties for truly special occasions.

Can you tell the difference?

If you look at this interesting comparison site, you will see that there’s just a hair of difference between champagne and cava, and even the grape varieties and production methods may be more or less identical. Could you tell the difference between a bottle of champagne and a bottle of cava from the same kind of grape and the same kind of soil? Probably not, unless you have a really sensitive palate, but your wallet will notice a saving of anything up to 50%.

Although champagne isn’t going anywhere in terms of the enduring romance of being a prestigious and celebratory wine, it’s interesting to note that in 2013, Prosecco outsold other sparkling wines worldwide for the first time.

Autumn Inspired Champagne Cocktails

The time for cool-weather drinking is upon us, so why not celebrate the season with some festive cocktails? Autumn gives us a great chance to experiment with seasonal flavors, whether you’re testing your own mixology skills or you’d prefer to take a special request to your favorite bartender.

Original Champagne Cocktail

This timeless cocktail has been left unchanged for over 150 years. Only a true classic stands the test of time quite like this single-serving recipe.

What you’ll need:

  • Angostura bitters
  • 5 ounces brut Champagne
  • 1 sugar cube
  • 1 lemon twist

Soak your sugar cube with the Angostura bitters in any sort of small glass or dish. Fill a chilled flute with your brut, then add that soaking sugar cube, finish with a lemon twist garnish and enjoy.

Cranberry Champagne Cocktail

This tart, refreshing creation from Food Network’s Tyler Florence is a crisp, fruity one-serving option that’s perfect for lunch or early-evening gatherings.

autumn-champagne-cocktailsWhat you’ll need:

  • Frozen cranberries
  • 1 ounce sweetened cranberry juice
  • 1 slice of lime
  • your choice of bubbly

 

Add the cranberry juice and a squeeze of lime in a chilled champagne flute. Top off the glass with the bubbly of your choosing, then garnish with a handful of cranberries. Toss more cranberries into the drink itself if you would prefer to increase the drink’s overall tartness.

Terrazza

This one takes a few more ingredients than usual, but the persistence pays off in a big way with this dry, light, slightly spicy, one-of-a-kind delicacy. The prep-time for this single serving is basically over once you find your necessary ingredients.

What you’ll need:

  • ¾ ounce Cynar
  • 2 dashes citrus bitters
  • 2 ounces rose vermouth
  • Ice
  • 3 ounces Prosecco, chilled
  • 1 blood orange wedge for garnish

Fill a chilled wine glass with ice, then add all your ingredients (aside from the garnish) and stir well. Garnish with orange wedge and enjoy.

Sparkling Apple Cider Sangria

Replacing the pinot grigio in typical cider sangria with your preferred style of bubbly makes this balanced sangria more bubbly and crisp, while still retaining its enjoyable tart-sweet core. This great option for fruit-filled fun shouldn’t take you more than ten minutes to make, and gives you between four and six servings.

What you’ll need:autumn-inspired-champagne-cocktails

  • 3 hone crisp apples
  • 3 pears
  • 2 ½ cups apple cider
  • 1 cup club soda
  • 1 bottle of preferred semisweet or brut Champagne
  • ½ cup ginger brandy

 

Chop up the required fruit, then combine everything together and stir for several minutes. Refrigerate for at least an hour before you serve.

Sparkling Pomegranate Punch

If we’re talking about tart-sweet drinks, the pomegranate serves us well as the perfect seasonal option. This punch that incorporates multiple different styles of wine with the beloved tart fruit, and the result is a bubbly, tart treat. This recipe takes no more than 20 minutes to finish, and it results in 10-12 servings, so this choice would work very well in a holiday party setting.

What you’ll need:

  • 2 oranges
  • 1 cup diced pineapple
  • ¼ cup pomegranate seeds
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • Ice cubes, per serving
  • 1 cup pomegranate juice
  • ¾ cup late-harvest Riesling, chilled
  • 2 750-mililiter bottles of preferred sparkling wine, chilled

Thinly slice up the two oranges crosswise, and dice your pineapple (assuming it didn’t come that way). Dissolve the sugar in the pomegranate juice while stirring vigorously. Then, add your sparkling wine and Riesling. Then, throw in the orange, pineapple and pomegranate seeds. Serve your punch fresh over ice.

How to Build a Champagne Fountain

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Without a doubt, a beautifully constructed champagne fountain creates a highly memorable focal point for any event from a wedding reception through a christening to a 50th year anniversary party and every other celebration in between. Here are a few tips on how to build a champagne fountain as easily as possible and with a minimum of fuss:

Build a stable base.  It is essential to start with a firm, solid base for the fountain. Anyone who has ever built a “tower of cards” understands this fact as a shaky table can undermine the best stacking effort. In the same vein, use a separate table so that any unnecessary jostling is kept to a minimum before the guests actually queue up to use the tower.

Use the right, same-sized glasses.  A seemingly small matter, it is essential to always use coupe champagne glasses. These are the somewhat retro but eminently usable short-stemmed ones that are easily stackable. Fluted glasses simply do not work. In addition, do not mix and match – make sure that you have enough identical glasses – your glasses as it will only complicate matters beyond repair.

Plan ahead.  The tower is made up of a square base layer. The second one is essentially the same but slightly smaller in size. For example, if the bottom layer is eight glasses by eight glasses, the layer above that would then be seven by seven, the layer above that six by six, and so on. FYI, this particular fountain yields just over 200 glasses of champagne.

Build properly.  The actual build takes some time and effort. In particular, ensure that each glass touches the ones surrounding it. This process guarantees stability and makes the subsequent layers that much easier to place. If done correctly, you will see a diamond-shaped gap between each glass. One more thing… when building the next layer, center the stem of the glass over these diamond openings for best effect.

Fill the glasses smoothly.  When it comes time to actually pour the champagne, you should not get overconfident. Do not start at the top and look for that cascading effect you see in the movies as the entire structure can become top heavy. Instead, half-fill each of the lower layers. Then, when they are stabilized, do the final flourish from the top of completely filling them.

Include a spillage tray.  The best laid plans of mice and men oft go astray. No matter how careful and exact the builder of a champagne fountain is, there will be anomalies. Save yourself some aggravation and clean-up time by including a spillage tray at the base or underneath to catch any overflow. Seriously, at the end of the night, you will thank us for this simple piece of advice.

5 Champagne Cocktails Perfect For Your Next Gathering

If you’re hosting a party or a cocktail hour and would like to serve some light, but enjoyable drinks, champagne cocktails are a great choice. Consider preparing one or more of these champagne cocktail recipes, which vary from sweet to dry.

Cranberry Orange Fizz

This cocktail is made with demi-sec champagne, which is a sweeter champagne, though not the sweetest. The bright citrus flavor and hint of tartness from the cranberry juice make it a good choice on a summer evening. The recipe makes a whole pitcher of cocktails.5-champagne-cocktails-perfect-for-your-next-gathering

Ingredients:

  • 1 orange, peeled and sliced
  • 2 cups cranberry juice, chilled
  • 1 bottle demi-sec champagne, chilled
  • 1/4 cup fresh cranberries

Place the sliced orange and the fresh cranberries in the bottom of a pitcher. Muddle them with a pestal or large spoon. Pour in the cranberry juice, followed by the champagne. Pour into champagne flutes to serve.

Strawberry and Pineapple Breeze

This cocktail boasts fresh flavors, but it’s not as sweet as you might assume, since it’s made with an extra dry champagne. The recipe makes one individual cocktail, but it’s easy to mix up these drinks one after another.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons strawberry puree
  • 1 ounce pineapple juice, chilled
  • 1 dash bitters
  • 4 ounces extra dry champagne, chilled

Pour the pineapple juice and bitters into a champagne flute, and add the champagne. Stir gently, and then pour the strawberry puree in gently. Serve before the puree has a chance to incorporate into the drink; this makes for a pretty presentation.

Old Fashioned Cognac Cocktail

If the occasion calls for something classy, mix up a round of these classic cognac cocktails. This recipe tends to appeal to an older crowd.
5-champagne-cocktails-perfect-for-your-next-gathering

Ingredients:

  • 4 ounces brut champagne, chilled
  • 1 ounce Cognac
  • 3 drops bitters
  • 1 sugar cube

Place the drops of bitters on the sugar cube, and place it in the bottom of a champagne glass. Pour the cognac into the glass, followed by the champagne.

Raspberry-Lemon Punch

This champagne cocktail is prepared like a punch. Make it in a large bowl, and let guests serve themselves in cute punch glasses. It’s great for a large party, as you can make 30 or more servings all at once.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup raspberry liqueur
  • 1/4 cup lemon vodka
  • 1 quart orange juice
  • 1 quart lemonade
  • 2 bottles semi-sweet champagne
  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 lemon, sliced thinly

Combine the lemon vodka, raspberry liqueur, orange juice, and lemonade in a large punch bowl. Give the mixture a gentle stir, and then slowly add the champagne. Garnish the punch with the raspberries and lemon slices before setting it out for guests to help themselves.

Champagne Mint Julep

Another non-sweet champagne cocktail, this one is perfect for a formal dinner or high-class cocktail party. It calls for extra-brut champagne, which is the driest available. If you prefer a slightly less dry champagne, feel tree to use brut or extra dry.5-champagne-cocktails-perfect-for-your-next-gathering

Ingredients:

  • 3 – 4 mint leaves
  • 1 teaspoon superfine sugar
  • 1 shot bourbon
  • 4 ounces extra-brut champagne, chilled

Add the mint leaves and sugar to the bottom of a cocktail shaker. Muddle well, using a pestal. Fill the shaker with ice, and add the shot of bourbon. Shake well, and then strain into a collins glass. Top with the champagne, garnish with additional mint leaves if desired, and serve.

When you make champagne cocktails, you don’t have to worry about having a whole selection of ingredients on hand. These recipes appeal to an array of palates and make for a simple and delicious drink selection at your next party.

 

What Appetizers Pair Best With Champagne?

what-appetizers-pair-best-with-champagne

Champagne is typically the first choice for parties and celebrations.  However, when you’re hosting, you may find yourself wondering just what appetizers to pair with this bubbly beverage.  Don’t despair! This is not just a great party wine!  It is actually one of the most versatile when it comes to pairing with foods.

The term ‘champagne’ simply means ‘sparkling wine’, so there is a lot leeway when it comes to shopping for a beverage, and its companion appetizers, at your next party. Whether it be a sparkling rose, a sparkling white, a brut champagne or true Champagne from that region of France, you can’t miss with the following suggested pairings:

Antipasto

Antipasto simply means ‘before the meal’ and is the traditional first course of an Italian meal.  Traditional antipasto includes such delights as cured meats, olives, cheeses and vegetables in oils. A table laid with these will complement a delicious dry sparkling champagne.

Cheeses and Breads

Or, you may want to complement your rich sparkling rose champagne with gourmet cheeses and breads.  Think soft, spreadable cheeses as well as chunks of cheese your guests can add to a plate alongside crackers or breadsticks.

Quesadillas

A light champagne for a feisty party pairs well with spicy bite sized quesadillas or even a mini taco bar.  Quesadillas have a great flavor and the champagne will not overpower them; it is a great match!

Grilled Appetizers

For a summer party, perhaps an outdoor fete, grilled appetizers are the way to go.  Champagne is light and airy, and your appetizers will be, too.  Grilled chicken satay, grilled steak kebabs, or simply some jumbo grilled shrimp may do the trick.

Vegetables

Another light appetizer choice is vegetables.  No, not a boring vegetable tray, although, you may certainly add one of those to any spread. But, in this case, thing stuffed peppers, stuffed mushrooms, asparagus rolls, tomatoes stuffed with goat cheese, grilled cauliflower bites, artichoke and spinach dip, and perhaps even cucumber sandwiches! Again, light fair to complement your light, airy beverage choice!

Flat Bread Pizzas

Finally, why not have a pizza party?  A serve yourself pizza party is fun to prepare, fun to serve and fun to eat!  Pizza goes great with anything, especially champagne!  Find small flatbreads or mini crusts for your guests (even wraps will do) and allow them to add their favorite toppings, which you will have spread out for them.  Pizza is everyone’s favorite, and it puts everyone in a good mood.  Add it to champagne and you have a perfect party!