What is Champagne Disgorgement?

what-is-champagne-disgorgement

Disgorgement is the process of eliminating the sediment from Champagne and sparkling wine before it is corked and ready for sale. The disgorgement date has nothing to do with the age of the sparkling wine or when it was put on sale.

The French term is degorgementThis is an important step in producing sparkling wines that probably has its origins in the Champagne district in France. The wine is fermented a second time for at least 15 months to three years, depending on the winemakers. The dead yeast cells resulting from the fermentation are called lees in English. The process is called aging sur lies in French.

The neck of the wine bottle is racked at an angle so that the sediments, including the dead yeast cells, collect in that part of the bottle as the wine ages. The bottles are racked with a freezing brine around the neck that makes sediment removal very easy. The bubbles help push the lees out of the neck and the dosage is added before it is securely corked and ready for sale. The disgorgement is one of the final steps in the process of making Champagne and other sparkling wines.

Dosage

This refers to the amount of sugar added to the wine before it is sold. Yes, sugar is added to French Champagne and other sparkling wines to give them more flavor and balance the acidity. The Extra Brut or dry sparkling wine has less than 6 grams of sugar per liter (g/l). The Brut, that has 6 to 15 g/l of residual sugar, is still very dry.

Wines with Sec designations usually have 16 g/l or more of sugar. An Extra Sec has up to 20 g/l of sugar. This makes the wine tastier to people who want a sparkling wine with a degree of sweetness. Demi-sec can have up to 50 g/l and Doux is the sweetest wine with more than 51 g/l of sugar. These are usually considered sparkling wines served with dessert.

Cuvee

This is the finished batch of sparkling wine. Champagne and other bubbly wines will not always be disgorged at the same time. A batch or cuvee with one date may taste different from bottles disgorged and prepared for sale at a later date. This system is now used for sparkling wines made in the United States and other countries.

If you are a knowledgeable wine consumer, you will be aware of the differences in the dates. Many people are not aware that the disgorgement date only tells you when the Champagne is prepared for sale. This makes the system open to controversy in the U.S. The good news is that more people who enjoy sparkling wines are now learning about this process so the date is important.

Wine experts advise consumers to buy what they like but to be aware that not all sparkling wines from one vineyard or winemaker will taste the same. Read the labels and experiment to find the sparkling wines you like.

How to Buy Inexpensive Champagne

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The words “inexpensive champagne” may fill you with horror, but inexpensive doesn’t have to carry all the connotations of “cheap”. In fact, going off the beaten track and avoiding the big brand names can lead to some fabulous discoveries that will be perfect for anything from the holiday season to family celebrations.

Champagne or Cava?

The first thing you can do to slash costs without losing quality is to head for other sparkling bubbly that can’t use the name by virtue of where it is produced. Prosecco, cava, and other sparkling wines are  similar type substitutes that can taste like they are ten times the price you paid for them. As with any wine, it’s a matter of personal taste, so if you’re sampling with a particular occasion in mind, be careful to do your physical research (i.e. drinking!) as well as reading online and offline reviews.

Deals and Steals

Close to the holiday season, retailers are keen to attract customers with good deals on food and drink, so if you find a variety you like, look out for offers such as free bottles for multibuys, and discounts with other purchases. Again, be wary, as this can often be a way to get rid of bottles that haven’t been so well-received, or are otherwise not selling for a variety of reasons.

The Right Stuff

If it absolutely has to be the real deal, from the Champagne region of France, then there are some familiar names that provide value as well as a guarantee that you are getting quality. A smart move is look for growers in valleys close to the big names, and try their produce, which is often a third of the price of wines bottled further up or down the valley. Additionally, choose bottles which are non-vintage, and save the premier label varieties for truly special occasions.

Can you tell the difference?

If you look at this interesting comparison site, you will see that there’s just a hair of difference between champagne and cava, and even the grape varieties and production methods may be more or less identical. Could you tell the difference between a bottle of champagne and a bottle of cava from the same kind of grape and the same kind of soil? Probably not, unless you have a really sensitive palate, but your wallet will notice a saving of anything up to 50%.

Although champagne isn’t going anywhere in terms of the enduring romance of being a prestigious and celebratory wine, it’s interesting to note that in 2013, Prosecco outsold other sparkling wines worldwide for the first time.

Autumn Inspired Champagne Cocktails

The time for cool-weather drinking is upon us, so why not celebrate the season with some festive cocktails? Autumn gives us a great chance to experiment with seasonal flavors, whether you’re testing your own mixology skills or you’d prefer to take a special request to your favorite bartender.

Original Champagne Cocktail

This timeless cocktail has been left unchanged for over 150 years. Only a true classic stands the test of time quite like this single-serving recipe.

What you’ll need:

  • Angostura bitters
  • 5 ounces brut Champagne
  • 1 sugar cube
  • 1 lemon twist

Soak your sugar cube with the Angostura bitters in any sort of small glass or dish. Fill a chilled flute with your brut, then add that soaking sugar cube, finish with a lemon twist garnish and enjoy.

Cranberry Champagne Cocktail

This tart, refreshing creation from Food Network’s Tyler Florence is a crisp, fruity one-serving option that’s perfect for lunch or early-evening gatherings.

autumn-champagne-cocktailsWhat you’ll need:

  • Frozen cranberries
  • 1 ounce sweetened cranberry juice
  • 1 slice of lime
  • your choice of bubbly

 

Add the cranberry juice and a squeeze of lime in a chilled champagne flute. Top off the glass with the bubbly of your choosing, then garnish with a handful of cranberries. Toss more cranberries into the drink itself if you would prefer to increase the drink’s overall tartness.

Terrazza

This one takes a few more ingredients than usual, but the persistence pays off in a big way with this dry, light, slightly spicy, one-of-a-kind delicacy. The prep-time for this single serving is basically over once you find your necessary ingredients.

What you’ll need:

  • ¾ ounce Cynar
  • 2 dashes citrus bitters
  • 2 ounces rose vermouth
  • Ice
  • 3 ounces Prosecco, chilled
  • 1 blood orange wedge for garnish

Fill a chilled wine glass with ice, then add all your ingredients (aside from the garnish) and stir well. Garnish with orange wedge and enjoy.

Sparkling Apple Cider Sangria

Replacing the pinot grigio in typical cider sangria with your preferred style of bubbly makes this balanced sangria more bubbly and crisp, while still retaining its enjoyable tart-sweet core. This great option for fruit-filled fun shouldn’t take you more than ten minutes to make, and gives you between four and six servings.

What you’ll need:autumn-inspired-champagne-cocktails

  • 3 hone crisp apples
  • 3 pears
  • 2 ½ cups apple cider
  • 1 cup club soda
  • 1 bottle of preferred semisweet or brut Champagne
  • ½ cup ginger brandy

 

Chop up the required fruit, then combine everything together and stir for several minutes. Refrigerate for at least an hour before you serve.

Sparkling Pomegranate Punch

If we’re talking about tart-sweet drinks, the pomegranate serves us well as the perfect seasonal option. This punch that incorporates multiple different styles of wine with the beloved tart fruit, and the result is a bubbly, tart treat. This recipe takes no more than 20 minutes to finish, and it results in 10-12 servings, so this choice would work very well in a holiday party setting.

What you’ll need:

  • 2 oranges
  • 1 cup diced pineapple
  • ¼ cup pomegranate seeds
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • Ice cubes, per serving
  • 1 cup pomegranate juice
  • ¾ cup late-harvest Riesling, chilled
  • 2 750-mililiter bottles of preferred sparkling wine, chilled

Thinly slice up the two oranges crosswise, and dice your pineapple (assuming it didn’t come that way). Dissolve the sugar in the pomegranate juice while stirring vigorously. Then, add your sparkling wine and Riesling. Then, throw in the orange, pineapple and pomegranate seeds. Serve your punch fresh over ice.

How to Build a Champagne Fountain

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Without a doubt, a beautifully constructed champagne fountain creates a highly memorable focal point for any event from a wedding reception through a christening to a 50th year anniversary party and every other celebration in between. Here are a few tips on how to build a champagne fountain as easily as possible and with a minimum of fuss:

Build a stable base.  It is essential to start with a firm, solid base for the fountain. Anyone who has ever built a “tower of cards” understands this fact as a shaky table can undermine the best stacking effort. In the same vein, use a separate table so that any unnecessary jostling is kept to a minimum before the guests actually queue up to use the tower.

Use the right, same-sized glasses.  A seemingly small matter, it is essential to always use coupe champagne glasses. These are the somewhat retro but eminently usable short-stemmed ones that are easily stackable. Fluted glasses simply do not work. In addition, do not mix and match – make sure that you have enough identical glasses – your glasses as it will only complicate matters beyond repair.

Plan ahead.  The tower is made up of a square base layer. The second one is essentially the same but slightly smaller in size. For example, if the bottom layer is eight glasses by eight glasses, the layer above that would then be seven by seven, the layer above that six by six, and so on. FYI, this particular fountain yields just over 200 glasses of champagne.

Build properly.  The actual build takes some time and effort. In particular, ensure that each glass touches the ones surrounding it. This process guarantees stability and makes the subsequent layers that much easier to place. If done correctly, you will see a diamond-shaped gap between each glass. One more thing… when building the next layer, center the stem of the glass over these diamond openings for best effect.

Fill the glasses smoothly.  When it comes time to actually pour the champagne, you should not get overconfident. Do not start at the top and look for that cascading effect you see in the movies as the entire structure can become top heavy. Instead, half-fill each of the lower layers. Then, when they are stabilized, do the final flourish from the top of completely filling them.

Include a spillage tray.  The best laid plans of mice and men oft go astray. No matter how careful and exact the builder of a champagne fountain is, there will be anomalies. Save yourself some aggravation and clean-up time by including a spillage tray at the base or underneath to catch any overflow. Seriously, at the end of the night, you will thank us for this simple piece of advice.

5 Champagne Cocktails Perfect For Your Next Gathering

If you’re hosting a party or a cocktail hour and would like to serve some light, but enjoyable drinks, champagne cocktails are a great choice. Consider preparing one or more of these champagne cocktail recipes, which vary from sweet to dry.

Cranberry Orange Fizz

This cocktail is made with demi-sec champagne, which is a sweeter champagne, though not the sweetest. The bright citrus flavor and hint of tartness from the cranberry juice make it a good choice on a summer evening. The recipe makes a whole pitcher of cocktails.5-champagne-cocktails-perfect-for-your-next-gathering

Ingredients:

  • 1 orange, peeled and sliced
  • 2 cups cranberry juice, chilled
  • 1 bottle demi-sec champagne, chilled
  • 1/4 cup fresh cranberries

Place the sliced orange and the fresh cranberries in the bottom of a pitcher. Muddle them with a pestal or large spoon. Pour in the cranberry juice, followed by the champagne. Pour into champagne flutes to serve.

Strawberry and Pineapple Breeze

This cocktail boasts fresh flavors, but it’s not as sweet as you might assume, since it’s made with an extra dry champagne. The recipe makes one individual cocktail, but it’s easy to mix up these drinks one after another.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons strawberry puree
  • 1 ounce pineapple juice, chilled
  • 1 dash bitters
  • 4 ounces extra dry champagne, chilled

Pour the pineapple juice and bitters into a champagne flute, and add the champagne. Stir gently, and then pour the strawberry puree in gently. Serve before the puree has a chance to incorporate into the drink; this makes for a pretty presentation.

Old Fashioned Cognac Cocktail

If the occasion calls for something classy, mix up a round of these classic cognac cocktails. This recipe tends to appeal to an older crowd.
5-champagne-cocktails-perfect-for-your-next-gathering

Ingredients:

  • 4 ounces brut champagne, chilled
  • 1 ounce Cognac
  • 3 drops bitters
  • 1 sugar cube

Place the drops of bitters on the sugar cube, and place it in the bottom of a champagne glass. Pour the cognac into the glass, followed by the champagne.

Raspberry-Lemon Punch

This champagne cocktail is prepared like a punch. Make it in a large bowl, and let guests serve themselves in cute punch glasses. It’s great for a large party, as you can make 30 or more servings all at once.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup raspberry liqueur
  • 1/4 cup lemon vodka
  • 1 quart orange juice
  • 1 quart lemonade
  • 2 bottles semi-sweet champagne
  • 1/2 cup raspberries
  • 1 lemon, sliced thinly

Combine the lemon vodka, raspberry liqueur, orange juice, and lemonade in a large punch bowl. Give the mixture a gentle stir, and then slowly add the champagne. Garnish the punch with the raspberries and lemon slices before setting it out for guests to help themselves.

Champagne Mint Julep

Another non-sweet champagne cocktail, this one is perfect for a formal dinner or high-class cocktail party. It calls for extra-brut champagne, which is the driest available. If you prefer a slightly less dry champagne, feel tree to use brut or extra dry.5-champagne-cocktails-perfect-for-your-next-gathering

Ingredients:

  • 3 – 4 mint leaves
  • 1 teaspoon superfine sugar
  • 1 shot bourbon
  • 4 ounces extra-brut champagne, chilled

Add the mint leaves and sugar to the bottom of a cocktail shaker. Muddle well, using a pestal. Fill the shaker with ice, and add the shot of bourbon. Shake well, and then strain into a collins glass. Top with the champagne, garnish with additional mint leaves if desired, and serve.

When you make champagne cocktails, you don’t have to worry about having a whole selection of ingredients on hand. These recipes appeal to an array of palates and make for a simple and delicious drink selection at your next party.

 

What Appetizers Pair Best With Champagne?

what-appetizers-pair-best-with-champagne

Champagne is typically the first choice for parties and celebrations.  However, when you’re hosting, you may find yourself wondering just what appetizers to pair with this bubbly beverage.  Don’t despair! This is not just a great party wine!  It is actually one of the most versatile when it comes to pairing with foods.

The term ‘champagne’ simply means ‘sparkling wine’, so there is a lot leeway when it comes to shopping for a beverage, and its companion appetizers, at your next party. Whether it be a sparkling rose, a sparkling white, a brut champagne or true Champagne from that region of France, you can’t miss with the following suggested pairings:

Antipasto

Antipasto simply means ‘before the meal’ and is the traditional first course of an Italian meal.  Traditional antipasto includes such delights as cured meats, olives, cheeses and vegetables in oils. A table laid with these will complement a delicious dry sparkling champagne.

Cheeses and Breads

Or, you may want to complement your rich sparkling rose champagne with gourmet cheeses and breads.  Think soft, spreadable cheeses as well as chunks of cheese your guests can add to a plate alongside crackers or breadsticks.

Quesadillas

A light champagne for a feisty party pairs well with spicy bite sized quesadillas or even a mini taco bar.  Quesadillas have a great flavor and the champagne will not overpower them; it is a great match!

Grilled Appetizers

For a summer party, perhaps an outdoor fete, grilled appetizers are the way to go.  Champagne is light and airy, and your appetizers will be, too.  Grilled chicken satay, grilled steak kebabs, or simply some jumbo grilled shrimp may do the trick.

Vegetables

Another light appetizer choice is vegetables.  No, not a boring vegetable tray, although, you may certainly add one of those to any spread. But, in this case, thing stuffed peppers, stuffed mushrooms, asparagus rolls, tomatoes stuffed with goat cheese, grilled cauliflower bites, artichoke and spinach dip, and perhaps even cucumber sandwiches! Again, light fair to complement your light, airy beverage choice!

Flat Bread Pizzas

Finally, why not have a pizza party?  A serve yourself pizza party is fun to prepare, fun to serve and fun to eat!  Pizza goes great with anything, especially champagne!  Find small flatbreads or mini crusts for your guests (even wraps will do) and allow them to add their favorite toppings, which you will have spread out for them.  Pizza is everyone’s favorite, and it puts everyone in a good mood.  Add it to champagne and you have a perfect party!

How to Open a Bottle of Champagne

how-to-open-a-bottle-of-champagne

A bottle of bubbly is the height of sophistication, but to put a twist to a great quote of our generation- with great style comes great responsibility. Being properly able to open a bottle of champagne is an art and fumbling at it will dissolve all your good reputation of charismatic host. In fact, a faux pas in opening this drink may be considered a travesty in some circles. So before you introduce this gem of your alcohol collection, learn a trick or two to do justice to the hundred dollar bottle.

The Proper Way

There are actually not many variations of the normal, proper way of opening a bottle of bubbly, even though hosts often try to alter the steps to wow their guests. But if you are of the more traditional mold, here are the steps to follow:

Make sure the champagne is chilled and calm. There is usually a gold foil wrapped around the cork of the bottle. Tease it out and remove the foil.

Keep the cork pointed away from you (and unsuspecting guests) so that it doesn’t pop out and take out someone’s eye.

You will see a wire frame over the cork which is intended to prevent accidental uncorking, which may occur due to pressure build-up. Loosen the cage and undo it. Also, keep a thumb firmly over the cork to prevent unpleasant surprises.

Put a towel over the cork. Now holding the cork stationary, gently turn the bottle by holding the base. In this way, you get to ease the cork off instead of popping it out. This is definitely less theatrical than popping the cork out, followed by a generous gush of champagne, but it does not waste any of the golden liquid.

Pour the champagne quickly into glasses, but make sure you pour it gently by the side and not splash it down. This way you will not lose the bubbles.

After pouring into each glass, do a quick turn of the bottle a bit to catch the liquid dripping down the lip of the bottle.

Sabrage

This is a tradition of opening a champagne bottle with a sword or a knife and it originated in France in the era of Napoleon. It is a widely popular party trick and is one of the coolest ways to open a champagne bottle. But unlike the popular opinion, it does not require great skill nor is it highly dangerous. Well, not unless you are doing it way wrong. Here’s the how-to:

Remove the foil.

Run a finger below the lip of the bottle and you will find a seam because champagne bottles are made of two pieces of glass.

Slide the dull edge of the knife on the seam from bottom.

In one fluid and mildly forceful motion, slide the knife from the bottom to the neck and pop. If you hold the bottle in a forty five degree angle, there will be little spill and there is no glass breakage.

So there you have, a proper way and a fun way to open a champagne bottle.

The Proper Way to Chill Champagne

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Getting the most flavor out of your favorite brut or doux champagne depends on more than picking your favorite vintage. How you choose to chill your champagne before serving can have a dramatic impact on the final taste.

Right Way to Chill Champagne 

There are essentially three ways that you can go about chilling champagne and preparing it ready for your guests.

Refrigerating 

The first way is through refrigerating your champagne for a few hours before guests arrive. Since the ideal temperature for chilling non-vintage champagne is between 40 and 50 degrees, placing your bottle in the fridge for approximately four hours should set you up perfectly.

Freezing 

Alternatively, though, you could put your champagne in the freezer for 20 minutes to achieve the same effect. You can get similar results by refrigerating your champagne for a few hours at a standard refrigerator temperature (40 degrees) or by placing your bottle in the freezer for 20 minutes.

Ice Bucket 

The third and final way that you might chill champagne before serving is through placing the bottle in a bucket of ice.

Fill an ice bucket half with ice and half with water, then chill your champagne for twenty five minutes. This is the preferred way of serving champagne in many restaurants, and definitely adds a classy touch to a New Year’s Day party.

Obviously, if you’re strapped for time, the ice bucket or freezer options are going to be more intrinsically appealing. The refrigeration option, though, allows you to dial in the exact temperature that you and your guests prefer.

Chilling Vintage Champagne 

Note that the above suggestions apply to non-vintage champagnes. For vintage champagnes you will want to follow a slightly different set of rules to bring out the natural richness.

As you probably already know, vintage champagnes are derived from select grapes in a single year’s selection.

Vintage champagnes like warmer temperatures – getting your vintage to approximately 50 degrees at serving time ensures that the taste and natural carbonation is retained.

Even 55 degrees wouldn’t necessarily be too warm a serving temperature for a vintage like Dom Perignon. Trust us, your guests will thank you for following these steps.

Heed These Storage Tips 

Maintaining the complex tastes and aromas of a vintage champagne – or a non-vintage, for that matter – depends on the right storage conditions.

A wider range of storage conditions can work here. Aim for between 45-60 degrees, but make sure that you’re storing champagne in a cool, dry place. Champagne is even pickier than many wines when it comes to light and temperature.

If you’ve ever wondered why champagne is often packaged in opaque, green bottles, it’s because the darker color makes the champagne more resistant to light (and degradation).

The bottom line is that both non-vintage and vintage champagnes taste best when stored in darker, cooler locations (e.g., a wine cellar). Also make sure that you serve your non-vintage champagnes at approximately 45 degrees and your vintage champagnes at between 50 and 55 degrees for best results.

How Champagne Flavors are Categorized?

how-champagne-flavors-are-categorized

Rumor has it that the Romans began cultivating what would later become champagne in France’s Champagne region starting around the fifth century.

Champagne: Past and Present 

Since the days of French kings receiving coronations over delicious champagne and the later innovations by the well-known Benedictine monk Dom Preignon, we’ve certainly come a long way.

Today everything from rose champagnes to prestige cuvees are happily uncorked and used to celebrate good times.

You may have also heard the terms “brut” or “demi-sec” tossed around – this simply refers to the sweetness and the amount of sugar added after secondary fermentation to the champagne itself.

Popular Types of Champagne 

To earn its namesake, all champagne must come from the champagne region of France and get its natural carbonation (“fizziness,” if you will) from a natural process known as secondary fermentation.

Black and White Grapes 

It’s more common for black grapes to be used in creating the cuvee upon which most champagnes are created.

Pinot meunier and the ever-popular pinot noir are two examples of black grape varieties that ultimately comprise some of the most crisp-tasting champagnes today.

Cuvees are also created from white grapes, however. In fact, one type alone, chardonnay, accounts for nearly half a million acres around the world.

Champagne aficionados still love the hints of citrus and smooth, buttery aftertaste of a good chardonnay.

Cuvee de Prestige 

Many producers separate their different offerings based on the vintage and quality of the cuvee as well as nuances of the grape-harvesting process.

For instance, a producer’s cuvee de prestige is that vineyard’s highest quality offering – this class includes Dom Perignon from Moet & Chandron as well as Cristal from Louis Roederer.

These champagnes are so well-received because the cuvees draw on the vineyards’ most vintage offerings.

Rose Champagne 

As the name implies, a rose champagne has the reddish appearance of roses – but why?

Rose champagnes are conversely known as pink champagnes; by whichever name, this kind of champagne gets its color and distinct taste through allowing the black grapes’ skin to soften in a process called the saignee method.

Sometimes a higher concentration of red wine is even added to rose champagne’s cuvee to guarantee the same color and gentler taste from one vintage to the next.

Blanc de Blancs 

In french “blanc” means white, so blanc de blancs translates to “white to white.” This refers to the fact that white chardonnay grapes are used for the cuvee or blanc de blancs.

Pol Roger’s blanc de blancs is especially well-regarded for its creaminess and ability to complement light dishes (e.g., cheese or nuts) or heavier entrees alike.

http://www.wine-searcher.com/m/2014/03/the-best-blanc-de-blancs

Champagne’s Sweetness Scale 

An alternative way of looking at champagne is to categorize it based on sweetness, or how much sugar is added after the secondary fermentation process.

Smaller vineyards tend to produce champagnes that are very dry, and either termed extra brut or (more rarely) zero brut. Extra brut means that there’s less than six grams of sugar per liter in the final product whereas zero brut means that there’s less than three grams of sugar per liter.

Moving up in sweetness from the bruts, we have extra dry, sec and demi-sec champagnes. These denote champagnes that have between one dozen and four dozen grams of sugar per liter in the final champagne.

Finally, your doux champagne is going to be the sweetest of the bunch at 50 grams or more per liter. Tastes vary, but many people prefer the crisp, dry flavors nearer the bruts and extra dry part of the spectrum. Stick with what works for you, and enjoy!

Champagne Glasses

champagne-glasses

Few things can symbolize a very special occasion better than a chilled bottle of champagne. From  intimate dinner parties to wedding dinners, it is the wine of choice when only the best will do. And for true wine lovers the style of glass can enhance or detract from your experience. What kind of glass will work best for you?

The Coupe

This classic shape, a wide rim and short stem, is best associated with the 1920’s flappers or the 1960’s. The glass was designed in 17th century England specifically for drinking champagne. However, the glasses were designed for what were really dessert wines, not the fine wines of the current day.

Critics of the coupe shape, or saucers as they are often called, suggest that the wide bowl is so broad that the carbonation falls flat too quickly. And, with the bubbles falling flat, the aroma is also lost.

For wine connoisseurs and those who love the bubbles, this glass style is not your best choice. If you love the history associated with the glass, then sip quickly and enjoy.

The Tulip

This style of glass is similar in design to he flute, but it has a wider base and he rim is curved inward. Unlike the coupe, wine connoisseurs highly recommend this glass because of its ability to retain your wine’s exquisite flavor.

The round bowl at the bottom of the glass keeps  helps to keep the flavor preserved as you sip your wine. The medium- to long-stemmed glass also keeps your fingers from touching the bowl where the champagne is preventing your fingerprints from warming the wine.

The Flute

The flute overtook the coupe shape because of how well it captures the flavor of the champagne. With a medium or long stem, you can hold the glass without altering the wine’s temperature, and  the glass is the perfect shape for the perfect sip.

The shape of the flute gives the right serving amount to keep it cold, aromatic, and bubbly. The flute glass maintains the effervescence after pouring so the bubbles and aroma stay in the glass. And when the bubbles stay in the glass, you can enjoy the bubbly taste and your glass will be more pleasing to look at.

The Stemless

The latest trends in new glass design include a stemless glass. This bowl-shaped glass enhances the taste and the aroma. Since your fingers are on the bowl warming the champagne, critics still prefer the flute.

The critics agree that the flute is your best choice. But take your time to sample them all to find a style that you love as much as your champagne.